St. Bridgets Convent

The St. Bridget’s Convent was founded by the Swedish religious order in 1407 and was the largest convent in the Livonian territories. It was rather extraordinary as it housed both nuns and monks. The monks lived in the southern section and were also allowed to leave the convent, while the nuns were living in the northern section and had to spend all their time praying, singing, reading and meditating. The convent operated until Ivan the Terrible destroyed it during the Livonian war in 1577.

Today several walls and its 35-metre gabled façade are still standing and have become a popular venue for outdoor concerts and festivals. In August, the well-known St Bridget’s festival takes place here. 

Tallinn TV Tower

The view from the recently fully renovated Tallinn TV Tower is unique in Estonia as well as in all of Northern Europe. It is the highest building in Estonia and its viewing platform at 170 metres is the highest in the Nordic countries.

Under your feet are the woods of Muuga while the captivating Tallinn Old Town and the glimmering Baltic Sea in all of its majestic glory are off in the distance. When Estonia was still behind the Iron Curtain, this was for many Estonians a window to the free world – at night one could even catch sight of the lights of Helsinki. Besides 360 degree unforgettable panoramic view brand-new Tallinn TV Tower features also exhibitions, 3D FILM projection, streaking skyward, cafeteria and restaurant, 170 m of space yawning under and gift and art shop. 

Tallinn TV Tower
Tallinn TV Tower
Tallinn TV Tower
Tallinn TV Tower
 

Maarjamäe Palace

This neo-gothic limestone building, named the Mary’s Hill in honour of his wife Maria, was the summer palace of the count Anatoli Orlov-Davydov’s family. The count served as the tsar’s chief of stables in St. Petersburg and spent his summers at Maarjamäe with his family.

The palace enjoys an enchanting view of the town and features a staircase that once was descending down on the beach. Now the road to Pirita, built in 1928, separates the palace from the sea. The palace grounds boasted a park, tennis courts and a painter’s studio for the countess.

From 1975, Maarjamäe palace is home to the Estonian History Museum- a wide-ranging exhibition dedicated to the history of the Republic of Estonia - its birth, development, occupation and recovered independence of the republic.  

Maarjamäe Palace

Viimsi Open Air Museum

This museum exhibits historic fishing village life, displaying old fishing tools and showing how people lived in this idyllic seaside village. 

Viimsi Open Air Museum
Viimsi Open Air Museum
Viimsi Open Air Museum

Aegna, Naissaar, Prangli

In summertime, passenger ferries do regular trips to those three small authentic islands in the Gulf of Finland.

Aegna and Naissaar have amazing intact nature and interesting history. During the Soviet times the islands were part of the tightly controlled border zone and access to all three islands was severely restricted.

Today those islands are a true heaven pampering visitors with quiet pine forests, idyllic beaches that stretch for kilometres and historical military attractions.

Prangli on the other hand has preserved its authentic fishing-village culture from the 13th century.

 

Aegna, Naissaar, Prangli